Human Resources South Africa|Friday, November 24, 2017
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How to Be Prepared For All Types of Job Interviews 

Basically are you, the job seeker, truly fit for this position, the best match for the company, and should I alert the big hiring boss that we have found a winner? Strangely, you’re called back for a third interview. This is the last step in the multi-tiered interview process. You, the job seeker, have finally made it to the hiring manager. The hiring manager is the catch all in the process. They catch anything that their human resources team may have missed, and decide during that interview whether or not they want to work with you.

Now that you have reached the end of this article, remember that this type of interview process can start with a phone interview. Use the career advice below to pass the elusive phone interview and find useful tips on a face to face interview.

Phone Interviews

Before the face-to-face interviews, you may have a telephone interview. Here are some tips to ensure a successful telephone interview:

o Schedule the interview period for a time when you won’t be distracted.

o Control your environment. Keep the dog chained in the backyard. Make sure the kids have a babysitter. Turn off TVs and radios. Ensure all distractions are kept to a minimum. Better yet, eliminate all distractions.

o Use a landline if one is available.

o Have a glass of water nearby, in case you get dry mouth.

o Have your interview notes and resume in front of you. Highlight those areas you believe are most important.

o Vary your pitch and response time. Don’t rush. Calculate your responses.

o Do not multi-task. Pay careful attention to the process. Having to ask the interviewer to repeat a question or comment indicates inattention.

Face-to-Face Interviews

Once you have gotten past the phone interview, here are some strategies designed to ensure a smooth, in-person interview process:

1. Sell it, Don’t Tell it

The interview is the time to “Sell” you. For example: You might be asked how many people you managed in your last position. You might be inclined to answer “35”. That’s “Telling.”

The “Selling” approach should be: “I managed a staff of 35, including both professionals and support personnel. Not only did I manage those individuals, I directed all recruitment and hiring activities, set salaries, designed and implemented bonus plans, facilitated annual performance reviews, and projected long-term staffing requirements. Additionally, my team increased sales by more than 35% in one year while reducing expenses by 10%”.

When presented in this fashion you have “Sold” your achievements and not just “Told” what you did.

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